If you’re looking for big air thrills, you may want to give snowkiting on Dillon Reservoir a try. Frozen Dillon Reservoir is a hub of snowkiting in Colorado. Riders come from all over the world to enjoy the expansive views and terrain and to learn the fundamentals of this unique sport. Experiments with snowkiting began in Germany and Switzerland in the late 1960s, but didn’t take off as a form of freestyle skiing and snowboarding in the United States until the 1990s.

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Athletes and adventurers alike have pushed the boundaries of the sport as kite design and materials have become more sophisticated. What began as an alternative to windsurfing and snowboarding has become an eco-friendly and efficient means of travel: In January of 2007, a team of explorers from the UK became the first people to reach the Antarctic Pole of Inaccessibility without the use of powered aid. They used kite skiing as their primary vehicle.

As if snowkiting wasn’t enough of a thrill already, people also build jumps and obstacles to make the flat terrain most often frequented by snowkiters more challenging. So if you’re looking for even bigger air, build a kicker.

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So, how do you build the perfect snowkite kicker?

Step 1: Bring the right tool.

DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel. Frisco, Colorado - OutThere Colorado
DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel. Frisco, Colorado.

We opted for the DMOS Stealth Shovel. The leverage that you get from the handle-shovel design allows you to move a lot of snow quickly, and its teeth are perfect for fine-tuning and grooming. Its compact design also makes it easy to pack in your trunk along with the rest of your gear.

DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel Frisco Colorado - OutThere Colorado
The leverage of DMOS Collective’s Stealth Shovel allows the shoveler to move a lot of snow with ease. Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado.

Step 2: Pile up the snow.

DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel Dillon Reservoir - OutThere Colorado
Pile the snow high on the mound to build the perfect snowkite kicker with DMOS Collective’s Stealth Shovel. Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado.

It’s as simple as digging up a lot of snow and dumping it in a pile. Keep piling until the mound is about four feet high with the expectation that the final product (after packing and shaping) will be approximately a half-foot shorter.

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Step 3: Pack down the ramps.

DMOS Collective's Stealth Shovel. Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado - OutThere Colorado
DMOS Collective’s Stealth Shovel. Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado.

Use the backside of the shovel to pack down both sides of the jump. Don’t be afraid to put some muscle into your packing! The kicker will erode quickly as boarders ride and sail over it if the snow is loosely assembled.

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Step 4: Smooth the sides of the jump for optimum lift off.

DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel, Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado - OutThere Colorado
Smooth the jump with the teeth and backside of DMOS Collective’s Stealth Shovel for optimum lift off. Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado.

The teeth on the edge of the Stealth Shovel allow you to groom the ramps of the kicker for that fresh corduroy look and feel.

Step 5: Send it!

DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado - OutThere Colorado
Snowkiter approaches the kicker built with DMOS Collective’s Stealth Shovel. Dillon Reservoir, Frisco, Colorado.

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Snowkiter on Dillon Reservoir, DMOS Collective Stealth Shovel - OutThere Colorado
Snowkiter sends a kicker on Dillon Reservoir. Frisco, Colorado.

*This article was sponsored by DMOS Collective. For more information about their portable snow shovels, check out their website. If you’re interested in learning more about their newest product, the Alpha shovel, a larger model than our Stealth, check out their Indiegogo page.

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