Trio Falls

Trio Falls is reached via a 15-mile roundtrip, out-and-back hike that starts at the Wild Basin Trailhead in Rocky Mountain National Park. From the Wild Basin entrance near Allenspark, it’s just over two miles to the Wild Basin Ranger Station and the trailhead. Follow signs to Ouzel Falls at two and three-quarters miles, passing the cut-off to Copeland Falls and crossing Calypso Cascades along the way. Cross the footbridge over Ouzel Creek and hike another two miles, then leave the main trail and get on Lion Lakes Trail. The route gets very steep and rocky past this point, and is faint at times. Continue for almost three more miles to Lion Lake #1 and Trio Falls.

Pro Tips

  • This is a long hike to a remote part of the park, so consider getting a backcountry camping permit and making a weekend of it. Check the Rocky Mountain National Park website for rules, regulations, and reservations.
  • The upper leaps of Thunder Falls may be viewed at about six-and-a-half miles along the trail. Take extreme care if you leave the trail to view these falls as the terrain is steep, loose, and slippery.
  • Rocky Mountain National Park is open year-round and is a fee area, so bring some cash or a credit card.
  • The trail and falls lie in the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness. Be sure to follow the Leave No Trace Principles when visiting any wilderness area.

Recommended season(s): Year-round.

Susan Joy Paul

Primary Activity

Summary

Trio Falls is reached via a 15-mile roundtrip, out-and-back hike that starts at the Wild Basin Trailhead in Rocky Mountain National Park. From the Wild Basin entrance near Allenspark, it’s just over two miles to the Wild Basin Ranger Station and the trailhead. Follow signs to Ouzel Falls at two and three-quarters miles, passing the cut-off to Copeland Falls and crossing Calypso Cascades along the way. Cross the footbridge over Ouzel Creek and hike another two miles, then leave the main trail and get on Lion Lakes Trail. The route gets very steep and rocky past this point, and is faint at times. Continue for almost three more miles to Lion Lake #1 and Trio Falls.

Pro Tips

  • This is a long hike to a remote part of the park, so consider getting a backcountry camping permit and making a weekend of it. Check the Rocky Mountain National Park website for rules, regulations, and reservations.
  • The upper leaps of Thunder Falls may be viewed at about six-and-a-half miles along the trail. Take extreme care if you leave the trail to view these falls as the terrain is steep, loose, and slippery.
  • Rocky Mountain National Park is open year-round and is a fee area, so bring some cash or a credit card.
  • The trail and falls lie in the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness. Be sure to follow the Leave No Trace Principles when visiting any wilderness area.

Recommended season(s): Year-round.

Susan Joy Paul

Elevation Top

11319

Map

Destination Type